Herbarium Glossary

Achene:

The seed. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Androgynous:

Staminate flowers on top of spikes containing both staminate pistillate flowers. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Aphyllopodic:

A term used for describing sedges with culms that have lower leaves that are bladeless. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Ascending:

Growing or curving upward at a 40 to 60 degree angle.

Auricle:

Ear-shaped appendages that are located at the top of the leaf sheath. They often occur in pairs. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Awn:

Stiff bristle on the top of a bract or scale. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Barbellate:

Having fine barbs, usually down the side of a structure. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Beak:

Hard firm projetion on the perigynia. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Bidentate:

Having two teeth. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Bract:

Modified leaf located near a flower or the inflorescence. (See figure for Bractlet)

Bractlet or Bracteole:

A secondary bract located on the pedicel of a flower. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Bristle:

A stiff hairlike structure. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Caudate:

Having a slender tail-like appendage Drawing by Nicole Abel

Culms:

A term used for the stem of grasses, sedges and rushes.

Elliptic:

Shape that is widest in the center and two equal ends. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Ellipsoid:

Solid body with an elliptic outline (see figure of elliptic for shape).

Gynaecandrous:

Pistillate flowers on top of spikes containing bot h staminate and pistillate flowers. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Glaberous:

Smooth with no hairs present.

Inflorescence:

The flowering part of the plant (flower cluster).

Laceolate:

Shaped like a lance. Several times longer than wide and a broad base that tapers to the top. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Ligule:

A membranous projection that extends up from inside of a grass sheath where it meets the blade. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Obconic:

Shaped like an inverse cone that attaches at the pointed end. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Obovoid:

Shaped like an inverse egg. The point of attachment is the narrow end. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Penduncle:

The stalk to an inflorescence or solitary flower. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Perigynia:

The bract in the pistillate flower that completely surrounds the pistil. In most species it is inflated. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Persistent:

Used as the opposite of deciduous. Refers to the structure that remain attached after similar structures fall off.

Pistillate:

Bearing pistils only.

Rosette:

A dense basal cluster of leaves that are arranged in a circular cluster. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Rhizome:

A long elongated stem that grows beneath and parallel to the surface of the ground. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Scabrous:

Rough or harsh to the touch. Usually due to short, stiff hairs or short, sharp projections. To test run finger lightly over the surface.

Septate-nodulose:

Longitudinal veins or nearves that have lateral veins that connect to divide the leaf to form a net like appearance. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Sessile:

Without a stalk. Creates the appearance that the spike or inflorescence grows directly from the culm. Drawing by Nicole Abel  

Staminate:

Bearing stamens only.

Tawny:

Dull yellow color with a hint of brown.

Tepal:

One of the parts of the outer whorl of the floral envelope. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Trigonous:

Three-angled (triangular in shape). Drawing by Nicole Abel

Triquetrous:

Having 3 sharp angles and concave or channeled sides. Drawing by Nicole Abel

Tuber-bearing:

Having small round structures that are often pimple like Literature Cited
Nikki Wiefling
nikki.wiefling at amec.com
Last modified 20 July 2008